Eric Loftin

Eric Loftin is a mixed media, cross-disciplinary artist intent on blurring the lines of what drawing and painting are. Being from the Willamette Valley in the Pacific Northwest, Eric draws much influence from the environment in which he grew up and is especially fond of the Santiam Canyon area. Eric graduated magna cum laude with a Bachelors Degree in Fine Art from Western Oregon University in June of 2015 where he earned awards for outstanding achievement in studio art (drawing) as well as art history. Also in June of 2015 Eric was nominated by the Western Oregon University Art Faculty to represent the university in an exhibition at Blackfish Gallery in Portland, Oregon. Eric finished his degree while continuing to work as a fine art instructor at Regis High School in Stayton, Oregon.

(More About Eric)

 

More about Eric Loftin

Eric has been teaching art since 2006 and before that spent a year as a studio assistant in drawing and painting at Chemeketa Community 

College. 

Eric’s work has been shown in various juried exhibitions in Portland, Monmouth, Mill City, Lake Oswego, and Salem, Oregon, as well as Denver, Colorado in November, 2015. In 2012 his work was shown at Saitama University in Saitama, Japan as part of a Western Oregon University exhibition. Most recently, Eric was named the featured artist for the “Flora and Fauna” exhibition at Splendorporium Gallery in Portland,Oregon in April 2016. While acting as Vice President of Ash Creek Arts Center in Monmouth and Independence, Oregon, Eric is also a 

current member and showing artist with the Salem Art Association and Bush Barn Art Center Galleries.

Eric’s current body of work deals with a dualities of play and consumption, growth and decay, time and memory, and most recently drawing and writing. The exploration and celebration of textures and materials allows Eric to achieve his version of artistic truth within each work. Eric presents the materials for what they are in a composition as opposed to manipulating them to achieve a complete illusion of a perceived reality, often juxtaposing objective and nonobjective information within many of his works.